Justice Reinvestment in Oklahoma


 

Justice Reinvestment in Oklahoma – After more than half a year of intensive analysis and collaboration, a bipartisan group of Oklahoma leaders today released a report on how to reduce violent crime statewide by 10 percent by 2016 and provide post-prison supervision for all felons while containing growth in prison costs. The report recommends a number of strategic reforms in criminal justice policy projected to save 9 million over the next decade, making it possible to allocate more than million to local law enforcement agencies to implement proven crime-fighting initiatives while reinvesting additional savings in strengthening victim/witness services, , probation supervision, drug treatment and other programs. The report is a product of the Justice Reinvestment Initiative, a data-driven analysis of the state’s criminal justice system led by the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center in partnership with the Pew Center on the States and the US Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance. The JRI process was guided by a 20-member working group of state and local criminal justice stakeholders established by the governor and legislative leaders following last year’s legislative session. House Speaker Kris Steele, co-chairman of Oklahoma’s Justice Reinvestment Working Group, plans to carry legislation next session based on the group’s findings. The policy recommendations in the report address a number of gaps within Oklahoma’s criminal justice system that were revealed through JRI’s

 

A new study shows that the best predictor of doctors' overall cost to the

Filed under: drug abuse treatment cost analysis program

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Filed under: drug abuse treatment cost analysis program

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